10 Adorable Cats with Long Whiskers (With Pictures)

Whiskers make a cat. Pointy ears, rounded face, triangular nose, whiskers…children’s drawings of animals present us with stripped down versions of everyday imagery–they simplify reality into its constituent parts, teaching us what makes something what it is in its most rudimentary form. While all cats do have whiskers, they can vary more widely than a child’s drawing may lead you to believe. Here we’ll outline 10 cats with long whiskers and break down their characteristics.

Interestingly, a cat’s whiskers enhance its other senses, and are best compared to the antenna of insects. They help cats maneuver through their environments, picking up and transmitting sensory data to the brain.

10 Cats with Long Whiskers

Because a cat’s whiskers are very sensitive, they should be treated more gently than the other hairs on a cat’s body. This is especially true for long whiskered varieties.

1. Siberian Cat

siberian cat | image by Theen Moy via Flickr | CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Average Lifespan: 12-18 years
Average Size: 15-20 pounds
Coat: long, dense

A large and robust breed, the Siberian Cat was originally developed in northern Russia. Well suited for living outdoors, this breed’s thick winter coat protects it from the harsh Siberian climate.

This massive cat not only possesses long whiskers, but has long hair all over its body. Its long whiskers and the ruff of fur around its neck have inspired comparisons between this breed and lions.

The Siberian Cat is an excellent mousing breed and was traditionally kept on farms and rural properties to curb rodent populations. It is one of the largest cats with long whiskers on our list.

2. Ragdoll Cat

ragdoll cat | image by rachelgreenbelt via Flickr | CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Average Lifespan: 10-15 years
Average Size: 12-18 pounds
Coat: long, dense

The Ragdoll Cat is a recently developed breed that was first bred in California in the 1960s by crossing Burmese and Angora cats. Much like the Siberian Cat, the Ragdoll possesses long hair and a ruff of fur around its neck. As with most long-haired breeds, it also features a thick and lengthy set of whiskers.

Bold and physically affectionate, the Ragdoll’s disposition has often been compared to that of dogs, as it is known for being playful and extroverted.

3. Norwegian Forest Cat

norwegian forest cat | image by Andrea via Flickr | CC BY-NC 4.0

Average Lifespan: 14-16 years
Average Size: 12-16 pounds
Coat: long

Related to the Siberian Cat, the Norwegian Forest Cat is another oversized breed originally from the northern reaches of Europe and Norway. Like the Siberian, the Norwegian Forest Cat is an excellent mouser and is well equipped to handle rough winters.

Known for its lengthy and muscular body, this breed is a powerhouse when it comes to working cats and is known for being a devoted and skilled hunter that does not require human interaction.

Despite this, the Norwegian Forest Cat does make for a good pet, and will certainly express itself lovingly to its owners. However, be prepared for an extra layer of hair around the house, as this larger breed comes with a good deal of shed.

4. Maine Coon

maine coon | image by Benoit Patelout via Flickr | CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Average Lifespan: 12-16 years
Average Size: 13-18 pounds
Coat: long, dense

One of the largest cat breeds, the Maine Coon was originally developed and bred in the state of Maine to control rodent populations on farms.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, as one of the largest cat breeds, and one with extremely long fur, a Maine Coon is on record as having the longest whiskers of any cat, making it one the number one breed of cats with long whiskers on our list.

A dedicated hunter, the Maine Coon can survive outdoors and provide for itself. Of its many skills and hunting habits, the Maine Coon is known for being a proficient swimmer.

5. Exotic Shorthair

exotic shorthair | image by Peter Guyan via Flickr | CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Average Lifespan: 8-15 years
Average Size: 10-12 pounds
Coat: short

Known for its flat face, the Exotic Shorthair was originally developed in the United States by crossing American Shorthair Cats with Persians and Russian Blues. Although originally outcrossed to improve the frame of the American Shorthair, the resulting breed has since been listed independently.

Surprisingly, unlike most of the other breeds on our list, this long-whiskered breed does not have a long coat, making it ideal for owners who are interested in whiskers, but not in all the extra shed.

While it does have long whiskers, the Exotic Shorthair’s flattened facial features also accentuate the length of its whiskers. Calm and demure, this breed is known to be an excellent companion animal.

6. Himalayan Cat

himalayan cat | image by: Joseph Morris

Average Lifespan: 8-15 years
Average Size: 7-12 pounds
Coat: long

A long-haired and docile breed, the Himalayan Cat’s origin is hotly debated within registry circles. Considered by some to be a variation of the Persian, some do not distinguish the breed as independent.

Like the Persian, the Himalayan Cat is known for being an especially passive and subdued breed that is both docile and affectionate.

Unlike the other long-haired cats on our list, the Himalayan possesses short and stubby legs relative to its body and is an ineffective hunter, being incapable of jumping or running for long distances.

7. Persian Cat

persian cat | image by The.Rohit via Flickr | CC BY-NC 4.0

Average Lifespan: 12-17 years
Average Size: 7-12 pounds
Coat: long

Related to the Himalayan, the Persian Cat traces its heritage to modern Iran, but has since become a popular breed across Europe and the world.

Also like the Himalayan, this breed is passive and docile, making it a great support animal. Known for its flat face and rounded features, the breed is also an ineffective hunter and is primarily kept as a pet.

Aside from sporting a dozen lengthy whiskers, the Persian’s coat is also incredibly soft and plush. Thankfully, the breed enjoys being held, allowing owners to touch and feel their coats at leisure.

8. Ragamuffin

ragamuffin | image by Teddy Llovet via Flickr | CC BY-NC 4.0

Average Lifespan: 10-15 years
Average Size: 11-17 pounds
Coat: long, dense

A close relative of the Ragdoll, the Ragamuffin was actually produced from Ragdolls and only distinguished as its own breed in the 1990s. Its coat has often been compared to the fur of rabbits, known for its soft and luxurious texture. A buff of this soft fur encircles its neck, making it leonine in appearance.

Outgoing and affectionate, the Ragamuffin, much like the Ragdoll, makes for a great household companion and support animal. Interestingly, the breed takes longer to mature than other cats with long whiskers, reaching adulthood after 4-5 years.

9. Birman

birman | image by Nicolas Rénac via Flickr | CC BY-NC 4.0

Average Lifespan: 12-16 years
Average Size: 6-12 pounds
Coat: medium-long, dense

Also known as the Sacred Cat of Burma, the Birman’s history is unclear, although it is originally thought to have come from modern day Myanmar. The breed was formally recognized in France.

A medium-sized breed, the Birman is described as possessing a squarish face and rectangular body, with a broad nose.

Despite possessing dense fur, the breed does not have an undercoat, meaning its fur is unlikely to become matted. Birman cats are also known for having “gloved” paws.

10. British Shorthair

british shorthair | image by Pablo via Flickr | CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Average Lifespan: 15-20 years
Average Size: 7-17 pounds
Coat: short

The only other shorthair variety on our list, the British Shorthair was originally developed in England and is the country’s standard domestic breed. A cat with ancient roots, the British Shorthair’s lineage can be traced back over 2,000 years, and has featured prominently in British culture.

The inspiration for the Cheshire Cat in Alice in Wonderland, the cartoon depiction of the breed nails its lengthy whiskers and mischievous appearance.